Health Tool - Child Wellness Visit

I’m wondering if our local families understand and take advantage of the benefits of well-child checks. Well child checks are important tools for you and your doctor to make sure your child is developing right and to screen for common problems that appear at specific ages.

What happens at a well-child visit?  We check your child’s growth and development, looking at their height, weight, and head size as compared to other kids their age and gender.  This can tell us if there are trends that need attention.  We also check age-appropriate milestones, social behaviors and learning.  We make sure your baby is able to do the things he/she should be doing by certain ages.  If we find a problem, we make recommendations:  continue to monitor, send to a specialist to evaluate, or get specialized services or therapy starting at an age young enough to make a difference.  We also talk about nutrition and safety in the home and community.  At well child checks, we discuss immunizations to prevent illness.  At the Perry Memorial Walnut Clinic and our other Perry Clinics, we offer immunizations for children whose insurance cover them.  If your insurance doesn’t cover immunizations, we discuss with you when and which vaccines your child needs to get at the health department – who typically can provide these necessary immunizations for free or at a reduced cost to children without insurance or who are underinsured.

Most insurances cover wellness exams 100%, especially for kids.  Check with your insurance provider to be sure.  Well-child checks are for healthy kids who are growing and seldom go to the doctor, as well as for children who are seeing doctors regularly due to chronic health issues.

In my office, I like to see kids at the following intervals starting from their newborn checkup (2-5 days old), 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months.  Then in the second and year, we would see them at 15 months and then every 6 months (18 months,  24 and 30 months of age) until they are 3.  Starting at age 3, we would then like to see the kids yearly until they are 21.  Their birth month is a good time to remember to schedule these visits, or you could do it in the summer when the children are off school.
 In the summertime (or any time of the year) we can incorporate school and sports physicals with the well-child check.  Keep in mind the well child visit and physical are not interchangeable.  The well-child check is much more comprehensive than the school or sports exams and is intended to catch any health problems early on.  Because of the wide range covered during the exam we can fill out the any required forms pertaining to the physical during this visit to save you time or an additional appointment.
Before you bring your child to the clinic for his/her wellness exam, make a list of topics you want to discuss with us, whether it be about how much sleep your baby should be getting, is a certain behavior normal, what and how much should they be eating, or maybe small health issues like skin lesions that you’ve deemed too minor to make an appointment for.

Regular wellness exams help your provider get to know your child and the family, so that they can know when something is amiss.  This consistency helps develop that medical home, where everyone knows your name.
Remember as you are making plans this summer, think about scheduling well child exams for your kids if they haven’t had one, need to get caught up on them, and especially if they need to get vaccines, or need physicals for camp,  school or sports.

 

Future of Health Partnership Discussion Begins

September 6, 2019

Representatives of Perry Memorial Hospital, the City of Princeton, and OSF HealthCare met for the first time on Tuesday, August 20 to begin the conversation on partnership options.  Discussion began as each organization shared its goals, and provided an explanation of why each party was interested in a more defined relationship.  Having similar and definable goals is an important first step in considering whether a partnership would be feasible.

Perry and the City of Princeton together have the goal to maintain and grow quality health care services, to sustain services over the long run, to benefit Princeton and the surrounding communities economically, and to improve care through access to technology. OSF representatives also shared they have a desire to keep local health care services available with an organization that is positive, high quality, and has the desire to work closely with the community.

Management agreement approaches with a range of options were discussed.  A list of specific services beneficial to Perry and the community were reviewed and prioritized.  The next step includes reviewing model options, which will take up to 90 days to complete and will be replicated for each partnership option explored by the Perry/City and OSF representative teams. 

“Our first meeting was productive,” said Annette Schnabel, DPT, MBA, FACHE, President and CEO of Perry Memorial Hospital. “We look forward to continuing our conversations on partnership options to best meet our communities of Bureau, Marshall, and Putnam Counties’ future health care needs.”

Conversations are ongoing and updates will be provided monthly through local media outlets.

 

Contact: Cathy Foes, Perry Memorial Hospital Director of Marketing (815) 876-4481
 
Perry Memorial Hospital:
Perry is a municipally-owned hospital and is a 25-bed critical access facility and has a workforce over 370 people.  June 17, 2020 marks the centennial celebration of providing healthcare to the service area.
 
About OSF HealthCare:
OSF HealthCare is an integrated health system owned and operated by The Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis, headquartered in Peoria, Illinois. OSF HealthCare employs nearly 21,000 Mission Partners (employees) in 126 locations, including 13 hospitals - 9 acute care, 4 critical access - and two colleges of nursing throughout Illinois and Michigan. Its physician network employs more than 1,200 primary care, specialist physicians, and advanced practice providers.  OSF HealthCare operates an extensive network of home health services; owns PointCore, Inc., comprised of health care-related businesses; and OSF HealthCare Foundation, the philanthropic arm for the organization. More at www.osfhealthcare.org