Health Tool - Child Wellness Visit

I’m wondering if our local families understand and take advantage of the benefits of well-child checks. Well child checks are important tools for you and your doctor to make sure your child is developing right and to screen for common problems that appear at specific ages.

What happens at a well-child visit?  We check your child’s growth and development, looking at their height, weight, and head size as compared to other kids their age and gender.  This can tell us if there are trends that need attention.  We also check age-appropriate milestones, social behaviors and learning.  We make sure your baby is able to do the things he/she should be doing by certain ages.  If we find a problem, we make recommendations:  continue to monitor, send to a specialist to evaluate, or get specialized services or therapy starting at an age young enough to make a difference.  We also talk about nutrition and safety in the home and community.  At well child checks, we discuss immunizations to prevent illness.  At the Perry Memorial Walnut Clinic and our other Perry Clinics, we offer immunizations for children whose insurance cover them.  If your insurance doesn’t cover immunizations, we discuss with you when and which vaccines your child needs to get at the health department – who typically can provide these necessary immunizations for free or at a reduced cost to children without insurance or who are underinsured.

Most insurances cover wellness exams 100%, especially for kids.  Check with your insurance provider to be sure.  Well-child checks are for healthy kids who are growing and seldom go to the doctor, as well as for children who are seeing doctors regularly due to chronic health issues.

In my office, I like to see kids at the following intervals starting from their newborn checkup (2-5 days old), 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months.  Then in the second and year, we would see them at 15 months and then every 6 months (18 months,  24 and 30 months of age) until they are 3.  Starting at age 3, we would then like to see the kids yearly until they are 21.  Their birth month is a good time to remember to schedule these visits, or you could do it in the summer when the children are off school.
 In the summertime (or any time of the year) we can incorporate school and sports physicals with the well-child check.  Keep in mind the well child visit and physical are not interchangeable.  The well-child check is much more comprehensive than the school or sports exams and is intended to catch any health problems early on.  Because of the wide range covered during the exam we can fill out the any required forms pertaining to the physical during this visit to save you time or an additional appointment.
Before you bring your child to the clinic for his/her wellness exam, make a list of topics you want to discuss with us, whether it be about how much sleep your baby should be getting, is a certain behavior normal, what and how much should they be eating, or maybe small health issues like skin lesions that you’ve deemed too minor to make an appointment for.

Regular wellness exams help your provider get to know your child and the family, so that they can know when something is amiss.  This consistency helps develop that medical home, where everyone knows your name.
Remember as you are making plans this summer, think about scheduling well child exams for your kids if they haven’t had one, need to get caught up on them, and especially if they need to get vaccines, or need physicals for camp,  school or sports.

 

Perry Robo Calls

October 29, 2018

Perry Memorial Hospital has been made aware of robocalls which identifies Perry as the phone number and caller. This has been occurring in our area for some time now and is complicated because of the phone number identification. This is a case of Caller ID “spoofing,” a high-tech manipulation of the Caller ID feature that allows the scammer to disguise their true identity by making the phone number appear to be that of the hospital.

As many of our phone numbers are direct line and publicized phone numbers, there are many phone numbers that could potentially be affected by this scam. Phone numbers being utilized are both active and inactive.

Annette Schnabel, President/CEO Perry Memorial Hospital said, “Perry Memorial Hospital leadership and staff are committed to the privacy of our patients and will leave appropriate messages only. Perry regrets that our phone numbers are being used by these scammer organizations. These calls are not a reflection of someone obtaining access to Perry’s patient data or protected health information (PHI).”

Please contact Kristi Warren at 815-876-3362 with additional questions/concerns.

Consumer Tips to Stop Unwanted Robocalls and Avoid Phone Scams

  • Don't answer calls from unknown numbers. If you answer such a call, hang up immediately.
  • You may not be able to tell right away if an incoming call is spoofed. Be aware: Caller ID showing a "local" number does not necessarily mean it is a local caller.
  • If you answer the phone and the caller - or a recording - asks you to hit a button to stop getting the calls, you should just hang up. Scammers often use this trick to identify potential targets.
  • Do not respond to any questions, especially those that can be answered with "Yes."
  • Never give out personal information such as account numbers, Social Security numbers, mother's maiden names, passwords or other identifying information in response to unexpected calls or if you are at all suspicious.
  • If you get an inquiry from someone who says they represent a company or a government agency, hang up and call the phone number on your account statement, in the phone book, or on the company's or government agency's website to verify the authenticity of the request. You will usually get a written statement in the mail before you get a phone call from a legitimate source, particularly if the caller is asking for a payment.
  • Use caution if you are being pressured for information immediately.
  • If you have a voice mail account with your phone service, be sure to set a password for it. Some voicemail services are preset to allow access if you call in from your own phone number. A hacker could spoof your home phone number and gain access to your voice mail if you do not set a password.
  • Talk to your phone company about call blocking tools they may have and check into apps that you can download to your mobile device to block unwanted calls.
  • If you use robocall-blocking technology already, it often helps to let that company know which numbers are producing unwanted calls so they can help block those calls for you and others.
  • To block telemarketing calls, register your number on the Do Not Call List. Legitimate telemarketers consult the list to avoid calling both landline and wireless phone numbers on the list.  
  • Federal Trade Commission www.fcc.gov